Posted tagged ‘Vanilla Production’

Of Lifou And Vanilla

December 5, 2018

Still in New Caledonia, we sailed to the island of Lifou. There I was determined to discover why vanilla has become so incredibly expensive. I got the best possible education by visiting the Vanilla House.

At the Vanilla House they have a demonstration garden, since the plantation itself is deep in the jungle. Here our guide explains to us how vanilla orchids are planted and cared for, and how the vanilla beans are harvested and processed.

In an amazing case of “what could Mother Nature possibly have been thinking???” each vanilla flower must be hand-pollinated in order to bear its fruit, which is the vanilla bean. There are no other pollinators here for this type of orchid, so humans do all the work. And an incredible amount of work is involved. Unimaginable, nearly.

Once mature, each green vanilla pod is hand-harvested. Then they are sorted by size, all by hand, and set in the sun to dry for two months.

Next they are shade-dried for an additional two to four months, before being sorted again by hand to ensure uniform size post-shrinkage.

The beans are then aged for six months or more, until they are the glossy black beans we are accustomed to seeing. Shockingly, after all that time and effort, the growers are only paid about $35 dollars per kilo for top quality beans. Since I normally pay exactly that amount for eight ounces of vanilla extract I had expected that they’d earn more.

The owner of the Vanilla House shows us a few animals they keep around the place, like this python,

and this coconut crab, which is really huge. The grounds are lovely,

showcasing fruits, shells, and coral from the island.

On the way back to the ship we see some traditional houses.

This one is the business of a beach-side hair-braider, and her decorations show off her braiding skills.

It’s yet another island of surreal beauty and contrasts. In the van on our tour I got to sit up front with the driver, who chattered away in French with me the entire way. She’s educated, a former teacher, and discusses French politics and the recent New Caledonian independence referendum with me. On the other hand, her husband is the chief of their tribe, and she tells me that they are in the middle of gathering their required 1000 fronds for the every five years’ re-thatching of the “great chief’s” house. 

When I tell her that requiring 1000 fronds sounds kind of feudal, she says “Oh yes, we are feudal here. But we are modern too. Everyone on Lifou has electricity and running water.” It’s a study in differences. And I’ll never complain about the price of vanilla again.

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