Things Not to Do in France

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The days are flying by, marked by adding things to our To Do lists, and then crossing them off.  More adding than crossing off, at this point, I have to admit, but we’re getting there.

This morning I realized that I can cross off a gratifying number of things if I make a list of things I won’t be doing in France.  It would start like this: making boudin noir at home.  I count that as a good thing, since the process of making that innocent looking bite, so delectably ensconced on its Walla Walla onion and fresh sage leaves, was truly gory.  Do yourself a favor and don’t click that link before breakfast!

Then there’s making red wine vinegar at home  like I’m doing here if you scroll down a bit,

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 making paté at home,  although this one was utterly delicious,

and making vin de noix at home dsc03277.jpg

since I’ve already missed the June window for starting the green walnuts infusing.

I’ve gotten into the habit of making things here that I know are readily available in France, and are undoubtedly better than my homegrown.  Now I’m starting to wonder what I’ll do with all that French free time.  Let’s hope I don’t feel a compulsion to start grinding my own peanut butter and making homemade catsup!

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Explore posts in the same categories: The Road To France

4 Comments on “Things Not to Do in France”

  1. Michel Says:

    Abra,

    Great blog!
    I am really enjoying reading about your prep work before leaving. My uncle in the Dordogne makes vin de noix and it is, to put it mildly, potent…
    Keep up the good work!
    Cheers!
    Michel

  2. abrabennett Says:

    Michel, perhaps I can get a vin de noix lesson from your uncle. Mine is very good, but not exquisite, and I could use a tutor!

  3. MickeyM Says:

    Even when Europeans went mad for all things American, peanut butter never made the cut. I think they find the stick-to-the-roof-of-your-mouthiness of it repulsive.

    Its almost universal appeal to Americans as comfort food completely mystifies them.

    I did manage to find it in health food stores in Germany back in the 70s. Don’t know about now.

    Mickey

  4. Nikki McGill Says:

    Great Blog!! We are from Canada and have moved to the South of France for one year with our two young daughters- nice to hear we aren’t the only ones!! We abouts are you?


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